2023 LDV eDeliver9 Review: Electric Van Fast Drive

2023 LDV eDeliver9 Review: Electric Van Fast Drive

Chinese automaker LDV is making a big game for delivery drivers with its eDeliver 9 electric van.





  • Drives exactly like a van should
  • The battery array did not affect the cargo hold
  • Well equipped… for a van
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What we don’t
  • The ride when unloaded is a bit brittle
  • No Android Auto or GPS
  • No rearview mirror?

2023 LDV eDeliver 9 electric van

LDV’s three-pronged attack on electrification is in full swing. In addition to Australia’s first electric ute – the eT60 – and the luxury electric vehicle Mifa 9, LDV has tripled the number of electric vehicles with the delivery van 2023 eDeliver 9.

In a way, an electric van makes the most sense of the three vehicles in LDV’s EV lineup.

Delivery trucks spend much of their time in an urban environment, making short trips from point to point to distribute their cargo before returning to base at the end of the day where they can spend the night recharging for the next day.



Important details 2023 LDV eDeliver9 LWB middle roof 2023 LDV eDeliver9 LWB high roof 2023 LDV eDeliver9 L4 cab chassis
Price $116,537 $118,836 $99,990

LDV offers three variants in the eDeliver 9 range – Center roof with long wheelbase, high roof with long wheelbase and cab chassis.

The variants with a long wheelbase are equipped with one 88.55kWh battery give 280 km (middle roof) and 275 km (high roof) driving range or the cab chassis has a smaller one 65 kWh battery and a range of 150 km.

All three vans are motivated by a permanent magnet synchronous motor that delivers 150 kW and 310 Nm to the front wheels.



Loading times vary. LDV says that using a three-phase AC charger takes about eight hours to charge the battery from five to 100 percent with a maximum charging power of 11 kW, although the Cab Chassis can be refilled in 6.5 hours thanks to its smaller battery array .

When using a DC quick charger, these times decrease, LDV states around 45 minutes from 20 to 80 percent.

According to the LDV, the packaging of the batteries did not compromise the cargo space. The displacement of the LWB center roof is said to be 10.97 m3 while the high roof offers 12.33 m3. The payload is 1410 kg for the middle roof and 1350 kg for the high roof.



2023 LDV eDeliver9 LWB middle roof 2023 LDV eDeliver9 LWB high roof 2023 LDV eDeliver9 L4 cab chassis
seats Three Three Three
payload 1410kg 1350kg 1960kg
length 5940mm 5940mm 6680mm
Broad 2062mm 2062mm 2052mm
Height 2545mm 2765mm 2052mm
wheelbase 3760mm 3760mm 4048mm

eDeliver 9 LWB Mid Roof prices start at $116,537 rising to $118,836 for the LWB high roof. The cab chassis starts at $99,990.

LDV gave us the opportunity to drive the LDV eDeliver 9, albeit for a very short time. Our short 12-minute street loop gave a taste of what delivery drivers can expect from the electric van.

And the news is good, the eDeliver 9 drives pretty much like a delivery truck.

Acceleration is decent, no better or worse than other vans we’ve driven recently. As we experienced with the crew-cab eT60, there’s something awkward about driving a van where the hum of an electric motor replaces the usual rattle of the diesel. But it’s not uncomfortable either.

Wind and road noise become slightly more dominant and the empty truck bed echoes with road noise. But that goes for all vans.

The cabin is well thought out with enough small features – like the overhead document trays – that we’ve come to expect from vans of this type.

The ride is brittle, but that’s to be expected in an empty van. A full charge should help mitigate that certain harshness.

It’s also decently equipped, with. A 10.1 inch touch screen with Apple CarPlay (but not Android Auto) and Bluetooth streaming.

Safety tech includes autonomous emergency braking, Bosch electronic stability control system, lane departure warning and a full suite of six airbags.



There’s also adaptive cruise control, hill start assist, and the two LWB vans score with front and rear parking sensors, while the cab chassis only gets by with front sensors.

At a glance 2023 LDV eDeliver9 LWB middle roof 2023 LDV eDeliver9 LWB high roof 2023 LDV eDeliver9 L4 cab chassis
warranty Five years, 160,000 km Five years, 160,000 km Five years, 160,000 km
battery guarantee Eight years, 160,000 km Eight years, 160,000 km Eight years, 160,000 km
maintenance intervals 24 months or 30,000 km 24 months or 30,000 km 24 months or 30,000 km
Energy Disadvantages (claimed) 33.9kWh/100km 34.5kWh/100km N / A
battery size 88.55kWh 88.55kWh 65kWh
Range claim (WLTP) 280km 275km 150 km (with large box mounted)
Charging time (11kW) 12:00 p.m 12:00 p.m 12:00 p.m
Charging time (maximum power 80 kW) 45m (20-80%) 45m (20-80%) 45m (20-80%)

Strangely, and perhaps because they were pre-production models, the cab of the eDeliver 9 LWB that we drove at launch didn’t have a rear-view mirror fitted. One could argue that with a full load on board, visibility through the rear windows is non-existent. Having said that, a rear-view mirror is crucial in our opinion.

Important details 2023 LDV eDeliver9 LWB middle roof 2023 LDV eDeliver9 LWB high roof 2023 LDV eDeliver9 L4 cab chassis
engine Permanent magnet synchronous motor Permanent magnet synchronous motor Permanent magnet synchronous motor
perfomance 150kW 150kW 150kW
torque 310Nm 310Nm 310Nm
drive type front wheel drive front wheel drive front wheel drive
weight 2640kg 2700kg 2090kg
towing rating 1500 kg braked 1500 kg braked 1200 kg braked
turning circle 14.8m 14.8m 15.8m

Overall, we see a solid argument for the eDeliver 9. It has an everyday driving range and overnight-friendly loading times. Our short test loop revealed a ICE van-like ride, and that’s not a bad thing.

As we keep saying, an electric vehicle is not for everyone. Still. But for those where an electric vehicle makes sense, the eDeliver 9 offers a decent alternative to the traditional van.

James Ward

James has been part of the digital publishing landscape in Australia since 2002 and has worked in the automotive industry since 2007. He joined CarAdvice in 2013, left the company in 2017 to work at BMW and then returned in late 2019 to take over the content leadership of Ride.

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